Lenten Rose

hellebore_pink_frost.jpgThis time of year flowers are a little thin on the ground in these northern climes. There’s snowdrops and winter aconites breaking through the earth, and buds are starting to form on the early spring flowers but the real stars of the show at this time of year are hellebores.

Popularly known as Christmas or Lenten roses (if anyone knows of a hellebore that flowers for Christmas please let me know !?) they’re part of the Ranunculaceae (buttercup or crowfoot) family and flower in shades of white and burgundy.  Their flowers hang down demurely and can sometimes be hidden by the large leaves that developed the previous year. The trick here is to carefully remove the leaves before the buds break.

If you visit your local garden centre you’ll see plenty for sale at this time of year.  I find them relatively expensive to buy fully grown as a result of other flowering options being so thin on the ground. The good news is they’re very easy to grow from seed and once you have one or two you will never be without new ones springing forth.

They take two to three years to flower when grown from seed but for less than the price of a coffee you can have a garden full of hellebores brightening your January and February days and flowering on until Spring.  Buy a packet, sprinkle them in semi-shade and watch hordes of them start to emerge from the soil. When they’re fully grown they can easily be relocated around your garden.

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The ones in my garden that have prospered have had virtually no intervention from me. I leave them to make their own way. It’s amazing how they find the right spot to be seen from the house.