Category Archives: Propagation & Growing

Laying on a (pollinator) buffet

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Outside catering always looks quite challenging. Doubtless you’ve been to wedding receptions and family gatherings where the food has either been terrible or insufficient. For our bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects life is one big outside buffet. Or at least it should be if those of us with gardens are doing our job properly.

There has been growing interest over the last few years in planting to benefit bees sparked by some startling statistics regarding their numbers. Across Europe we’ve lost over half of our bees in the past twenty or so years. In England the drop is one of the most dramatic. There’s all kinds of reasons cited for this but one that we can all do something about is what  we plant in our gardens. Where once nectar heavy cottage garden plants were the order of the day for most gardeners, the second half of the twentieth century saw the growth in popularity in more stylised gardens complete with hybrid plants. Add to that the general loss of urban gardens for car parking and building and the spread laid on for bees has been dramatically denuded. Pollinators play a huge part in feeding the nation and fueling the economy. Across China and the US ,the twin drivers of global growth , pollinator numbers have seen a rapid decline. The insect charity Buglife suggest that if current trends continue we won’t have enough to pollinate the crops we need to feed ourselves.

Thankfully that’s beginning to change but we all need to play our part. Even if you don’t have a garden you can plant a few pollinator friendly plants in pots on a balcony or outside your front door. If you’ve a backyard you can fill it with plants in pots. When we lived in a terraced house with just a backyard the walls were covered in Campanula portenshchlagiana the Dalmatian bellflower.

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It was all over the back alley and popping up on outhouse roofs. In the summer there would be an explosion of bluish purple flowers that acted like a magnet to bees. When our backyard was filled with pollinator friendly plants what had been a dead, quite hard concrete space felt like it was part of the natural world again. Campanula self seeded into our own pots and has traveled with us to our current house where it’s currently going native across the neighbourhood

There’s few things finer (and satisfying!) on a sunny day when the garden is flowering than seeing bees at work across the garden. And it’s very easy to attract them. The more pollinator plants you plant the more you will see. My own small garden is geared towards wildlife and I try now not to add anything that isn’t going to be of benefit to pollinators. They help to animate a garden.

Where to start ? There’s lots of info available on the web and the RHS as always is a good place to begin;

RHS Perfect For Pollinators

To help you when you’re buying plants look for the RHS Perfect For Pollinators badge;

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If you’re buying from small nurseries (and I’d heartily recommend that you do) then look out for wallflowers, lavender, nepeta (catmint), purple loosestrife, foxgloves, hollyhocks, jacob’s ladder, honeysuckle, agastache, monarda, salvias, scabious,  marjoram and  thyme.  If you’ve only got the space to plant one tree then make it a rowan. Ideally you should ultimately aim for something to be in flower that’s of interest to pollinators all year round.  Pesticides should be avoided and if you can build or buy a box for solitary bees to nest then you’re heading towards bee-topia.  Brunswick Organic Nursery in Bishopthorpe usually have a smashing range of pollinator friendly plants available all raised without the use of chemicals.

Amongst the varieties of bees that visit our garden in the summer our favourites are the leaf-cutter bees that have taken up residence in the ventilation pipes in our outside walls. They take bites from the rose leaves and drag them into the pipes behind themselves to help keep things cosy.

 

Lenten Rose

hellebore_pink_frost.jpgThis time of year flowers are a little thin on the ground in these northern climes. There’s snowdrops and winter aconites breaking through the earth, and buds are starting to form on the early spring flowers but the real stars of the show at this time of year are hellebores.

Popularly known as Christmas or Lenten roses (if anyone knows of a hellebore that flowers for Christmas please let me know !?) they’re part of the Ranunculaceae (buttercup or crowfoot) family and flower in shades of white and burgundy.  Their flowers hang down demurely and can sometimes be hidden by the large leaves that developed the previous year. The trick here is to carefully remove the leaves before the buds break.

If you visit your local garden centre you’ll see plenty for sale at this time of year.  I find them relatively expensive to buy fully grown as a result of other flowering options being so thin on the ground. The good news is they’re very easy to grow from seed and once you have one or two you will never be without new ones springing forth.

They take two to three years to flower when grown from seed but for less than the price of a coffee you can have a garden full of hellebores brightening your January and February days and flowering on until Spring.  Buy a packet, sprinkle them in semi-shade and watch hordes of them start to emerge from the soil. When they’re fully grown they can easily be relocated around your garden.

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The ones in my garden that have prospered have had virtually no intervention from me. I leave them to make their own way. It’s amazing how they find the right spot to be seen from the house.