Category Archives: Wild Flowers

Laying on a (pollinator) buffet

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Outside catering always looks quite challenging. Doubtless you’ve been to wedding receptions and family gatherings where the food has either been terrible or insufficient. For our bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects life is one big outside buffet. Or at least it should be if those of us with gardens are doing our job properly.

There has been growing interest over the last few years in planting to benefit bees sparked by some startling statistics regarding their numbers. Across Europe we’ve lost over half of our bees in the past twenty or so years. In England the drop is one of the most dramatic. There’s all kinds of reasons cited for this but one that we can all do something about is what  we plant in our gardens. Where once nectar heavy cottage garden plants were the order of the day for most gardeners, the second half of the twentieth century saw the growth in popularity in more stylised gardens complete with hybrid plants. Add to that the general loss of urban gardens for car parking and building and the spread laid on for bees has been dramatically denuded. Pollinators play a huge part in feeding the nation and fueling the economy. Across China and the US ,the twin drivers of global growth , pollinator numbers have seen a rapid decline. The insect charity Buglife suggest that if current trends continue we won’t have enough to pollinate the crops we need to feed ourselves.

Thankfully that’s beginning to change but we all need to play our part. Even if you don’t have a garden you can plant a few pollinator friendly plants in pots on a balcony or outside your front door. If you’ve a backyard you can fill it with plants in pots. When we lived in a terraced house with just a backyard the walls were covered in Campanula portenshchlagiana the Dalmatian bellflower.

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It was all over the back alley and popping up on outhouse roofs. In the summer there would be an explosion of bluish purple flowers that acted like a magnet to bees. When our backyard was filled with pollinator friendly plants what had been a dead, quite hard concrete space felt like it was part of the natural world again. Campanula self seeded into our own pots and has traveled with us to our current house where it’s currently going native across the neighbourhood

There’s few things finer (and satisfying!) on a sunny day when the garden is flowering than seeing bees at work across the garden. And it’s very easy to attract them. The more pollinator plants you plant the more you will see. My own small garden is geared towards wildlife and I try now not to add anything that isn’t going to be of benefit to pollinators. They help to animate a garden.

Where to start ? There’s lots of info available on the web and the RHS as always is a good place to begin;

RHS Perfect For Pollinators

To help you when you’re buying plants look for the RHS Perfect For Pollinators badge;

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If you’re buying from small nurseries (and I’d heartily recommend that you do) then look out for wallflowers, lavender, nepeta (catmint), purple loosestrife, foxgloves, hollyhocks, jacob’s ladder, honeysuckle, agastache, monarda, salvias, scabious,  marjoram and  thyme.  If you’ve only got the space to plant one tree then make it a rowan. Ideally you should ultimately aim for something to be in flower that’s of interest to pollinators all year round.  Pesticides should be avoided and if you can build or buy a box for solitary bees to nest then you’re heading towards bee-topia.  Brunswick Organic Nursery in Bishopthorpe usually have a smashing range of pollinator friendly plants available all raised without the use of chemicals.

Amongst the varieties of bees that visit our garden in the summer our favourites are the leaf-cutter bees that have taken up residence in the ventilation pipes in our outside walls. They take bites from the rose leaves and drag them into the pipes behind themselves to help keep things cosy.

 

Banking on Primroses

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And in the wood, where often you and I,
Upon faint primrose-beds were wont to lie…

William Shakespeare – A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

My Spring/Summer timetable began with rain, biting cold winds and a winter that has felt like it would never end. At times like these as a gardener you keep faith in the turning seasons and the inevitable pull of summer.  It might be cold, the pace of things in the garden might currently be slow but it’s the calm before the storm.  Give it a few weeks and the pace will be hectic, everything bursting with life and demanding attention. Despite the cold over the last few weeks the sun that’s broken through the clouds has sometimes had real warmth in it. I ended last week in shirt sleeves for the first time this year.

I also ended the week planting primroses. The wild British primrose – Primula vulgaris – has suffered over the last few decades as its traditional habitats in woodlands, on verges and beneath hedgerows came under threat. Also, its increased popularity led to people helping themselves to the wild variety – a definite no-no. Traditionally they would be picked as gifts for parents at Easter and used to decorate churches.  It takes its name from the latin, Prima Rosa ‘the first rose’ despite being as far from a rose as you’re likely to find. In different counties of England it is also referred to as butter rose, early rose, Easter rose, golden rose and lent rose. And lucky old Devon has it as the county flower.

The market in cultivated garden varieties in all kinds of colours and degrees of flowering longevity is vast but to my mind nothing really beats the warm, buttery sunshine of the wild variety on an early Spring day when other flowers are still thin on the ground. Because they flower through to the beginning of June they serve as a bridge between winter and the profusion of summer.

The wild varieties themselves appear in a variety of shades from pale cream to deep yellow. If you allow them to establish themselves in your garden over time you’ll begin to see variations appearing.

One thing I really like about the wild primrose when its planted in a domestic garden is how it serves as a thread between the green spaces beyond the garden wall and the cultivated patch. Wild varieties of daffodils do the same and here in York the banks of the city walls are currently coming alive with them.  Often when I’m out and about at this time of year I’ll glance down and see a patch of primroses appearing in the least promising of urban locations. It’s always a pleasure to plant them in my clients’ gardens and even more of one to see them naturalise.