Tag Archives: Garden Writing

Walk Out To Winter

It doesn’t seem like five minutes since we were all baking in what felt like endless heat. The summer was one of the hottest on record. Here in York temperatures in the high twenties and low thirties became the norm. It made for some challenging working conditions at times even if  I rarely had to don the waterproofs, grit my teeth and battle on through the rain.

The good weather continued into autumn and I started to feel I was going to make it to Christmas without too many occasions where I resembled a drowned rat.  The last few weeks of mild, wet weather have quickly put an end to that thought.

So with December finally here I’m enjoying the end of term feeling even if I’ve got jobs in the diary right up to the Christmas.  I get more time to catch up with my admin, read some gardening books and blogs and do all those jobs I never get time for in the summer.

Winter isn’t a completely dead season in the garden. There’s a lot going on out there. There’s even some colour to be had.  My camellia is flowering already, my  Clematis cirrhosa var. purpurescens ‘Freckles’ is covered with flower buds.

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The Cosmos have only just exhausted themselves after a late summer and autumn of hectic flowering, there’s a rose or two hanging on here and there, likewise a few lavatera flowers.  The hellebores are looking primed and ready for their moment in the precious February sun, green tips of  snowdrops are poking up here and there.

If you’re in need of an urgent colour injection there’s plenty of winter pansies and cyclamen around in garden centres/nurseries/ supermarkets.  Winter pansies in particular always impress me. They look so insubstantial and a little frail but put up with everything even the most extreme winters can throw at us. They issue their challenge to weather in yellows, white, purples and reds. Dot them around your garden like season long Christmas lights.

Planning ahead you might want to consider planting a patch of winter flowering heathers or a Japanese Quince. Sink the corms of winter aconites in a spot beneath a tree, likewise snowdrop bulbs.  Mahonia with their in your face yellow flowers shine like a beacon in the darkest months, the stems of dogwoods stand out against the grey.

It’s really hard to predict what the winter will have in store for us. This time last year the few days we spent in Newtondale by the North York Moors Railway line was crowned with the white stuff.WP_20171203_14_00_21_Pro 4

And it was still snowing when my Spring diary began in March.  If the early days of Winter set the tone for what’s to come then we can expect mild and wet.  Different winters present different challenges not least in a city where the water that falls in upland areas  and turns peat black has to pass through on its way out to the sea.

Whatever the winter has in store it’s a good time for gardeners to put up their feet a little and congratulate themselves on a job well done.  It won’t be long until there’s barely chance to draw breath again as the seasons roll relentlessly on.

 

That old September feeling…

September is a month that really divides opinion.  If you’re of school age (or perhaps a teacher) its approach can be a mildly depressing one. You look forward to the summer for ages and then in a blink of an eye it’s gone and it’s back to school in an itchy new uniform. If summer is about freedom then September is all about buckling down.

If you’re a gardener however September has a very different quality.  I often debate in my head which is my favourite month to be outside working. There’s attractions and drawbacks to all of them but what September generally has (in the UK) at least is a helpful lack of extremes.

There’s enough heat not to have to wrap up.  More importantly there’s still heat in the soil meaning there’s still plenty going on. It’s a good time of year to oversow patches of lawn, scatter wildlower seeds and plant overwintering onion sets.  More generally though it’s a good month to garden.

It feels like the foot has been taken off the pedal a bit. Weeds have begun to slow down. There’s less to do. In the high summer you can sometimes feel as if you’re running to stand still with lots of jobs demanding your attention.  Add to that long dry spells and all the watering involved and it can feel like there’s little time to actually enjoy the garden.

September offers that window of time when there’s still warmth and colour but less pressure to keep on top of things.  As well as dahlias, things like rudbeckia, eryngium and lavatera are all going strong. In my garden the cosmos patch keeps throwing up new flower buds, sedums are coming into their own and the geranium I gave a mid-summer tidy up are now offering a second flush of flowers.  If you’re growing vegetables it’s a time of wondering what to do with all those squashes.

The light takes on a special quality in September too. If you’ve fruit trees the ground is scented with fermenting windfall, the insects seem to turn a little woozy as spiders spin dew scented webs everywhere I put my head.

It’s just a shame it’s all too fleeting.  If the first half feels like summer’s final flourish, then the second half can be autumn’s entree.

It’s a good time to be outside and I always feel satisfied at having got through the demands of another horticultural summer.